Why We Love South London Hip Hop Artist Loyle Carner’s Latest Video Filmed In Georgetown, Guyana
Photo Credit: Aboodi Vesakaran

Photo Credit: Aboodi Vesakaran

Why We Love South London Hip Hop Artist Loyle Carner’s Latest Video Filmed In Georgetown, Guyana

african diaspora , Caribbean , Guyana , London , United Kingdom , news
Amara Amaryah
Amara Amaryah Jan 20, 2023

If you didn’t know, Loyle Carner’s ‘Georgetown’ is the ultimate love letter freshly admired within and beyond the Diaspora. It is Guyanese representation in full force, with poetry and ease and lots of water.

The lushness of the land and the vibrancy of the Guyanese have kept the country high on our list. Carnival lovers and waterfall chasers alike can agree that the country has much to boast about. Just as we thought we had seen all there is to see about this South American country, Loyle Carner drops ‘Georgetown’ with legendary Guyanese poet John Agard and our hearts open for the Caribbean sounds once more.

Forget what you know of Georgetown–or what you don’t–this video offers a natural, local and refreshing look at what makes Guyana’s capital special. The South London artist has Guyanese roots, which he gleefully reconnects with on camera for all to gush over. With a sound that is instantly recognizable though seasoned with Caribbean vibes, Loyle Carner’s ‘Georgetown’ comes as a welcomed surprise.

Be it the poetic fusion in his music, the presence of iconic literary greatness in Agard, or the dense rainforest hues and richly painted concrete, there is something to admire throughout the video. Even still, here is what we love most about Loyle Carner’s ‘Georgetown’.

Bringing to life the connection between UK artists and the Caribbean

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by LC (@loylecarner)

“>

The first thing we love about ‘Georgetown’ is the ongoing tradition of the diaspora in the UK reconnecting with the Caribbean. Legendary Guyanese poet himself John Agard and spouse Grace Nichols fall into this legacy. Kamau Brathwaite, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Roger Robinson, and Malika Booker form part of this tradition of calling in Caribbean histories through their poetry. It’s warming to see Carner maintaining that tradition. 

Loyle Carner reconnecting with his roots

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by LC (@loylecarner)

“>

In ‘Georgetown’, we see Loyle Carner reconnecting with his roots by finding peace with his Black identity. As a mixed raced person growing up in the UK with only his mother’s white side of the family, his Guyanese ancestry felt distant. Fast-forward to now and Loyle Carner, very much at home with the colors and the sounds of Guyana, has a new sense of belonging, and much to catch up on we’re sure. 

Connecting with local Guyanese artists

In a BBC interview, Loyle Carner shared not only that he felt that “he was part of something finally” when visiting Guyana but also that he had connected with local musicians. In particular, we’re excited about his collaboration with the renowned Guyanese flutist Keith Waithe. Carner tells the BBC that this meeting changed the way he worked. See the results of this delicious Caribbean collaboration here.  

Authentic Caribbean brought to the mainstream

The Caribbean is varied. We’ve written extensively about how picture-perfect, commercialized images of the Caribbean are damaging and offensive to Caribbean efforts and nations. We’re grateful that Carner tapped into the real, authentic, and natural sights of this Caribbean, South American country. 

Seeing John Agard's poetry in his homeland gives the poem a whole new meaning

The vibrancy of John Agard’s famous poem ‘Half-Caste’ hardly needs anything to bring it to life. The poem holds enough movement, imagery, and noise to animate any reading. But put the poem in Agard’s home country, while he reads in his iconic, distinctly Caribbean voice as a silent Loyle Carner glides along a river with the lushness of his land in the background framing him, and we’re gifted with new layers to the poem. We noted a touch of sobered tenderness while we listen to ‘Half-Caste’ in Carner’s ‘Georgetown’ and it felt like a full circle moment for those familiar with the poem. 

Diversity in people and landscapes, Loyle Caner represents well

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by LC (@loylecarner)

“>

There is no way to miss it, this is a video that acts as an open love letter to Georgetown. And how giving a visual it is. ‘Georgetown’ represents the variety of landscapes, peoples, and ways of experiencing everyday life in Guyana, and we love it. 

Potential for more Guyanese influence to come

Word has it that this trip to Guyana inspired much in the South London Hip Hop artist. We’re ready to see how else Carner will infuse his love for Guyana into future projects!

Related: The Best Of Jamaica Like A Local: Travel With Toni-Ann

Student’s Pocket Knife Led To Arrest & Police Escort In London

Travel Noire, Stamp Tales