How This Black-Woman Owned Winery Was Influenced By Zimbabwe
Photo Credit: Photo by David Fuller

Photo Credit: Photo by David Fuller

How This Black-Woman Owned Winery Was Influenced By Zimbabwe

black owned business , oregon , wine
DeAnna Taylor
DeAnna Taylor Jun 19, 2020

Eunice Chiweshe Goldstein is a woman who wears many hats. The UCLA film grad not only spends time working in Los Angeles in the film industry, she is also Oregon’s first Black woman winery owner and winemaker.

After learning of Oregon’s great grape fields, she decided to open the Eunice Chiweshe Goldstein Winery in Astoria, just a few hours outside of Portland.

She was exposed to wine by her grandmother in Zimbabwe at an early age, and draws a lot of inspiration from her. Her grandfather was involved in the beer industry as well.

Photo by David Fuller

“I spent a lot of time watching my grandparents in the Eastern Highland region of Zimbabwe,” Eunice told Travel Noire. “They really influenced my love of wine and winemaking.”

A big part of the winery’s mission is its ‘purpose wines.’ Proceeds from these special bottles go towards a charity or mission that is selected and supported for the month. Eunice and her team are currently focusing on the Black Live Matter movement and are donating proceeds to programs that support the cause.

“It takes a village. The concept of purpose wines comes from my Zimbabwean culture. We believe in coming together to help each other. We are at such a key turning point in time for Black America. We are rising up and saying “enough is enough” with racism and police brutality.”

The Eunice Chiweshe Goldstein Winery features its own private label wines with blends like pinot noir, rosé, and chardonnay. There is also a tasting room in Astoria that you can visit to sample the wines in-person.

When it comes to being a first in this industry, Eunice is grateful. Grateful to the ancestors before her for fighting for our rights, and the right to be accepted as a culture.

“Because of the ancestors, I can wake up everyday, stay optimistic, and push ahead,” she said.

Eunice eventually wants to begin growing grapes in her family’s homeland of Zimbabwe and then import wines from there. It is a way to always stay connected to her roots.

To learn more about this winery or to purchase, visit the website: www.eunicechiweshegoldsteinwinery.com. You can also find it on Instagram at: @eunicechiweshegoldsteinwinery.

Related: Meet The Black Man Behind The Northwest’s Only Hip-Hop Winery