Take Your Mexico Trip Up A Notch By Sleeping In A Tequila Barrel
Photo Credit: TN

Photo Credit: TN

Take Your Mexico Trip Up A Notch By Sleeping In A Tequila Barrel

Hotel , Mexico
Brunno Braga
Brunno Braga Apr 25, 2022

Mexico is a favorite destination for the Travel Noire family. Many head to Cancun, Tulum, and even Cabo for their adventures. But, how about stepping outside your comfort zone by visiting a city outside the traditional Mexican tourist itinerary? Our suggestion? Matices Hotel de Barricas. The hotel is located in a brewery in the city of Tequila, in the state of Jalisco. And just like the spirit, it has barrel-shaped rooms.

It even offers tequila tasting sessions and guided tours of the facility and an on-site museum.

Barrels that have been turned into hotel rooms are nothing new. Wineries around the world offer this experience. But for those who want to visit Mexico, this is a great opportunity to sleep inside a giant barrel of tequila.

The barrels have been packaged with all the essential elements without setting aside their rustic seal that matches the atmosphere of the city of Tequila. The barrels can serve as a refuge that will allow you to spend days relaxing, while getting to know the land where the Mexican liquor was born.

The rooms are in the middle of an agave plantation— the plant used to make Mexico’s iconic drink— and have air conditioning, a sofa, coffee maker and minibar, as well as a bathroom.

The hotel is part of the tourist complex of the La Confradía brewery and is just a 10-minute walk from the city center.

Over the years, Matices Hotel Barricas has positioned itself as one of the best concept hotels in the country. The experiences that await will change the way you experience the city; from its canteen, cellar, horse rides through the agave field and much more.

History

Tequila originated in the city of tequila, in the heart of Mexico, brewed from the blue agave plant, native to the highlands of Jalisco.

Historians believe that in the early twelfth century the plant was used in the preparation of a drink that would be the precursor of tequila, the pulque. A fermented agave-based drink was used in rituals. There were severe punishments for those who consumed the drink for pure pleasure.

When the Spanish conquistadors arrived in Mexico in the 16th century, they took the brewery process with them and switched to distilling pulque instead of fermenting it, making the drink more like the tequila we know today. In the 18th century, businessman José Cuervo began to bottle and sell the drink.

Jayson Aaron

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