'We Moved To Ghana From The Netherlands So Our Children Could Learn Their History'
Photo Credit: The Acheampong Family

Photo Credit: The Acheampong Family

'We Moved To Ghana From The Netherlands So Our Children Could Learn Their History'

Accra , Ghana , traveler story
Parker Diakite
Parker Diakite Feb 25, 2021

Anna Acheampong’s daughter came home upset from school one day in The Netherlands, after questions came up about her race. What was most shocking to Anna was that her daughter insinuated that she would have more friends if her hair was straighter and her eyes were blue.

“My daughter started noticing that she was different from the rest of her classmates and when the questions came up, I asked myself, ‘do I want to raise my kids in this environment?'” said Anna to Travel Noire. “For me growing up in a white neighborhood with white people around me in The Netherlands, I have what I call a ‘race radar.’ I felt racism so much, and I don’t want that for her.”

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Anna and her husband have Ghanaian fathers and Dutch mothers. They decided to use their daughter’s experience as a teaching moment and moved to Ghana to teach their two-children more about African culture and heritage.

The Acheampongs began their journey during the Year of Return campaign in 2019. It was only supposed to last one year.

Courtesy of The Acheampong Family

“I remember our immediate circle saying, ‘Are you crazy?’ ‘Why would you go to Ghana for a year?'” said Anna. “That’s why we started documenting our time here in Ghana on YouTube.”

Through their family YouTube channel, the Acheampongs hope to change the narrative of what it’s like to live in Africa. Anna admits that she was exhausted from the hustle-and-bustle in Europe. In Ghana, the family spends more time on their mental health and wellness and spending quality time together. Anna tells Travel Noire that the best part of living abroad is the fact that they are celebrated in ways they were not in The Netherlands.

“It’s still a very strange thing that we’re learning to deal with. We’re coming from receiving racism to being celebrated. When we tell people that we’re Ghanaian, we came back, people are genuinely happy to be to meet us. It’s amazing,” she said.

You can follow along on their journey on Instagram or the family vlog on YouTube.

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