Here Is The CDC’s Latest Advice On Holiday Travel
Photo Credit: valentinrussanov | Getty Images

Photo Credit: valentinrussanov | Getty Images

Here Is The CDC’s Latest Advice On Holiday Travel

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Leah Freeman-Haskin
Leah Freeman-Haskin Sep 29, 2020

It’s about to be that time of year again. The holiday season is only a few weeks away, and with surging COVID-19 cases in many states, you may be wondering if it’s safe to travel this season. Many of us have not seen our families in months and are eager to reconnect and celebrate the holidays together. Here are some recommendations from the CDC if you are planning a trip in the coming months.

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The CDC still emphasizes that traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19, and “staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others.” But if you decide to travel, these are their recommended safety measures:

  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when in public places.
  • Avoid close contact by staying at least 6 feet apart (about 2 arms’ length) from anyone who is not from your household.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
  • Avoid contact with anyone who is sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
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For Halloween this year, the CDC recommends lower-risk activities such as decorating your house, carving pumpkins, an outdoor scavenger hunt, a virtual Halloween costume contest, or a Halloween movie night with people you live with. They list door-to-door trick-or-treating as a higher-risk activity.

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Likewise, the CDC recommends partaking in lower-risk activities around Thanksgiving. These include having a small dinner with people in your household, having a virtual dinner with long-distance relatives, and shopping online instead of in person for Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals.

The CDC lists people who should not attend in-person holiday celebrations as those at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, those with symptoms of the virus, and people still waiting on results from a COVID-19 test.

Source: cdc.gov