Design Your Life

11 Safety Tips For The Female Business Traveler

By DeAnna Taylor

Share

More women are landing roles that require them to travel. However, their employers are failing to provide them with the information and tools to stay safe.

 

Many women are skeptical or hesitant to travel for business due to safety concerns. In fact, it was reported that 83 percent of women have encountered one or more safety concerns while traveling for work in the past year according to research done by the Global Business Travel Association (GBTA).

 

“High levels of concern have a tangible impact on business travel for women,” Amanda Cecil, Senior Vice President of Professional Development and Research for GBTA, said in a statement. “Previous GBTA research has shown the immense impact travel experience can have on productivity and business results while on the road. Ultimately all travelers want to be productive and get business done, so understanding the specific risks female travelers face on the road can allow travel buyers to play a critical role in addressing these concerns. ”

 

Related: Solo Travel Is On The Rise Despite The Extra Costs. 

 

63 percent of female business travelers think about their safety often while away on business. Additionally, many women feel more unsafe now than they did just five years ago.

 

Related: 11 Best American Cities For Solo Travel.


 

For those women who travel for business or even general female solo travelers, we’ve put together this list to help you stay safe.

 

  • Tell a family member or friend about your travel plans and leave a copy of your itinerary with them.
  • Enroll in the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program.
  • Avoid booking flights that land very late at night when many services will be closed.
  • Keep a copy of your passport with you at all times, especially abroad.
  • Look into purchasing travel insurance and/or emergency travel medical coverage.
  • Keep your cash and credit cards in two different places.
  • When talking to strangers never use “I” language, instead use words like “we.”
  • Avoid wearing flashy jewelry, if possible.
  • When out in an unfamiliar place, try not to “look lost.”
  • Purchase a SIM card or an international plan for your cell phone to ensure service at all times.
  • Stay alert at all times, avoid walking around strange places with earphones in.
Share
Travel Noire

DeAnna Taylor

DeAnna Taylor is a criminal defense Attorney turned travel writer. The Charlotte native recently completed one year abroad working as an English teacher in South Korea. Her hobbies include fitness, traveling to new countries, and trying new foods.

Want more?

Get exclusive, unpublished tips from Travel Noire's CEO to help you get off the beaten path, into the hearts of locals and onto a better, more cultured life.

Is Solo Travel Safer For Men Than It Is For Women?

Is Solo Travel Safer For Men Than It Is For Women?

You’ve probably heard someone in your life say that “women should never travel alone.” But the truth is that more and more women are opting out of the group travel concept and hitting the road (or the air) solo. Of course, there are risks. We watch the news and see the dangers women face just […]

Sharelle Burt

What’s The Difference Between A Hotel And A Motel?

What’s The Difference Between A Hotel And A Motel?

Have you ever wondered what the actual difference is between a motel and a hotel? Maybe you’ve noticed that hotels tend to be more expensive and often offer more amenities than motels. Based on the history and origins of each type of accommodation, they serve a distinct purpose depending on your travel needs, budget, and […]

Leah Freeman-Haskin

Black People Should Wear Sunscreen, Too

Black People Should Wear Sunscreen, Too

Black people are not immune to skin cancer. One of the most harmful health misconceptions about people with darker skin is that we don’t get sunburned and we don’t need to wear sunscreen. Your melanin may be poppin’, but it still needs to be protected from the sun. According to skincancer.org, anyone can get skin […]

Leah Freeman-Haskin