Throw Down Big Bucks To Chow Down At These Five Expensive Restaurants
Photo Credit: Photo by Obi

Photo Credit: Photo by Obi

Throw Down Big Bucks To Chow Down At These Five Expensive Restaurants

Black-owned restaurants , expensive restaurants , new york city , restaurants
Spencer Jones
Spencer Jones Oct 16, 2022

Have you ever dreamed what it would be like to splurge an entire paycheck on a single dining experience? If you’re on Instagram, Baller Alert published a post about some of the world’s most expensive restaurants.

The caption reads as follows:

“For some, there is no limit to a quality meal. After all, good food in beautiful settings can be hard to come by. If you’re in the mood for something new or have been looking for a reason to take a trip, let one of these fin- dining restaurants be your excuse to pack your bags. ⁠We must warn you, however, that to feast at these restaurants, you must be prepared to drop a bag. Though we promise you won’t regret a dollar of it.”⁠

Some of the comments were comical. One person asked, “where’s the food?” while another wrote, “none of ’em looked worth any penny. I can get sushi anywhere and can always eat at the aquarium (a reference to Ithaa Undersea Restaurant).”

Are you willing to throw down big bucks to chow down? Here are five of the world’s priciest restaurants.

Ithaa Undersea Restaurant- Maldives

 

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This gem in the Maldives is the world’s first undersea restaurant. It opened in 2005.

Ithaa is Dhivehi for “Mother of Pearl,” and this restaurant is 16 feet below sea level. The New York Daily News called it “the most beautiful restaurant in the world.”

It goes without saying that the price tag capitalizes on the unusual ambiance. And obviously, people are willing to pay it.

Enjoy a six course meal while tropical fish and other marine life swim above your head.

The cost? Approximately $300 per person.

Kyoto Kitcho Arashiyama- Japan

This Toyko establishment spares no expense. According to Baller Alert, it gets top marks for service, food and decor.

Baller Alert writes, “this dining experience costs anywhere from $380 to $570 a head, with six locations throughout Japan to choose from. However, the one in Tokyo appears to be the most popular. Enjoy dishes such as sea urchin rice and conger eel, made from the freshest ingredients.”

 

 

 

Bar Masa- New York

 

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It’s no shocker than one of the country’s most expensive cities would make this list.

This Japanese bar and restaurant is located in Columbus Circle.

The founder, Chef Masayoshi Takayama, takes an experimental approach to Japanese cuisine. And the staff is well- versed in his approach.

The assortment of sushi platters, hot meals and the cocktails are eye-catching. Equally so are the prices. You could be looking at $1,000 per person, excluding drinks!

Per Se- New York

 

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Here’s another New York staple that’ll have no mercy on your wallet. Coincidentally, it’s at the Deutsche Bank Center, next to Bar Masa.

Founded by Thomas Keller in 2004, this Michelin-starred establishment offers enviable views of Columbus Circle and Central Park.

According to the website, “two tasting menus are offered daily: a nine-course chef’s tasting menu, as well as a nine-course vegetable tasting menu. No single ingredient is ever repeated throughout the meal.”

The wine list includes 2,000 different bottles.

 

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay- England

This London restaurant didn’t make Baller Alert’s list. But it should have because you need to be making bank to dine there.

It’ll run you a couple hundred pounds per person.

According to The Richest, “it’s one of three London restaurants that holds three Michelin stars.”

The space is small and reservations are hard to secure. But if roast pigeon, suckling pig and lemonade parfait with sheep’s milk yogurt sound appetizing, go off.

 

Miss Enocha

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