Spain Sells Skin Tone Postage Stamps For Racism Campaign, But White Stamps More Valuable
Photo Credit: Correos

Photo Credit: Correos

Spain Sells Skin Tone Postage Stamps For Racism Campaign, But White Stamps More Valuable

DeAnna Taylor
DeAnna Taylor May 28, 2021

When trying to do the right thing, goes wrong. Spain and its postal service found itself under fire this week after an anti-racism campaign went left. The campaign called for the rollout of several skin tone stamps, but somehow the white and lighter toned stamps, were given a higher value than darker tones.

The campaign was created to begin just in time for the one-year anniversary of George Floyd’s killing and European Diversity Month.

“The darker the stamp, the less value it will have,” the state-owned company, called Correos, said in a news release announcing the launch. “Therefore, when making a shipment, it will be necessary to use more black stamps than white ones. That way, each letter and each shipment will become a reflection of the inequality created by racism.”

While some understood the intention, many social media users didn’t feel this same sentiment.

Some described the campaign as “accidentally racist” after it was revealed that a darker stamp would cost 70 cents and a lighter or white stamp was 1.60 Euros.

Black Spanish author, Moha Gerehou, acknowledged the message meant well, but like similar campaigns across Spain, missed the mark because they are often created by mostly white people within industries that lack diversity.

Correos collaborated with a federation of non-government anti-racism organizations and Spanish rapper, El Chojín “to make this reality [of racial discrimination] visible.”

Courtesy of Correos

“We have seen it these days in Ceuta, we see it every day in the Mediterranean, in the growing xenophobic and racist discourses that are taking hold in Europe,” a statement of the campaign read.

Even after the backlash, the postal service never issued a statement or update on the campaign or whether they would work to rectify things.

According to The Washington Post, between 2016 and 2019, Spain has recorded a more than 20 percent increase in racist and xenophobic hate crimes in the country.