Traveling With Small Children Comes With Its Perks
Photo Credit: Luis Quintero | Pexels

Photo Credit: Luis Quintero | Pexels

Traveling With Small Children Comes With Its Perks

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Leah Freeman-Haskin
Leah Freeman-Haskin Aug 7, 2019

Traveling with your kids may seem like a daunting undertaking, but it’s helpful to know what benefits are available to you when you arrive at the airport. Take full advantage of these small perks that can make a big difference when traveling with little ones.

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Free To Check

If you are having second thoughts about bringing the stroller or car seat to the airport, remember that these items can be checked for free to your final destination. And most airlines provide plastic bags or other coverings to wrap these items before you check them. Both items can either be checked for free at check-in or at your gate – whatever is most convenient to you.

Early Boarding

Most airlines let families traveling with children under the age of 2 get settled into their seats before general boarding begins. You can usually push this to ages 3 and 4 if you feel like you really need the extra time. Make sure you get to your gate on time so you can take advantage of this perk.

Use The Helpline

Inform the TSA officer if your child has a disability, medical condition, or medical device, and advise the officer of the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process.

TSA Cares is a helpline to assist travelers with disabilities and medical conditions. Call TSA Cares 72 hours prior to traveling with questions about screening policies, procedures, and what to expect at the security checkpoint. You may also call to request assistance at the checkpoint.

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Faster Screening

According to TSA.gov, children ages 12 and under can leave their shoes, light jackets, and headwear on through the security screening process. Modified screening procedures are also in place for children to reduce the likelihood of a pat-down.