NC Plantation Faces Backlash For 'Telling White Refugee Stories’ Juneteenth Event
Photo Credit: Canva

Photo Credit: Canva

NC Plantation Faces Backlash For 'Telling White Refugee Stories’ Juneteenth Event

Charlotte , news
Parker Diakite
Parker Diakite Jun 11, 2021

You can’t make this up. Latta Plantation, just outside of Charlotte, NC, has removed promotion for a racist event planned on Juneteenth following backlash on social media.

The description of the event called “Kingdom Coming” promised to deliver stories from the “massa himself who is now living in the woods” because “federal troops have him on the run and his former bondsmen have occupied on his home.”

It goes on by stating, “What will he do now that he has no one to oversee from can see to can’t see? White refugees have been displaced and have a story to tell as well.”

And to add insult to injury, the living history museum planned the event on Juneteenth: a holiday commemorating the emancipation of slaves in the United States.

It remains unclear whether the event is actually canceled but organizers have removed promotion of the event after they found themselves in hot water.

County officials issued a statement via social media stating, “Mecklenburg County has zero tolerance for programs that do not embrace equity and diversity. Park and Recreation was not aware of the planned event at Latta Nature Preserve until it appeared on social media. We immediately reached out to the organizers and the event was cancelled. As a result of this incident, Mecklenburg County is looking at its contract with the facility vendor regarding future programming.”

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Historic Latta Plantation is located in Huntersville, located about 20 miles north of Charlotte. It’s an 1800 plantation house and grounds that claims to give visitors a “glimpse into 19th-century life in the Carolina backcountry.”

According to The Charlotte Observer, this isn’t the first time Latta Plantation has found itself in the midst of controversy. In 2009, a Black tour guide selected three Black students from a majority white group to help reenact the lives of slaves on the plantation.