Madagascar COVID Surge Forces Schools To Convert To Mobile Hospitals
Photo Credit: 2Photo Pots

Photo Credit: 2Photo Pots

Madagascar COVID Surge Forces Schools To Convert To Mobile Hospitals

COVID-19 , Madagascar , news
Malik Peay
Malik Peay Apr 23, 2021

The island country of Madagascar is undergoing a massive COVID-19 spike that is impacting the reopening of their school systems. The second-largest island nation in the world inhabits nearly 27 million people and the country has seen nearly 30,000 coronavirus cases since the global pandemic.

Now, Madagascar has recorded 520 deaths and the sudden rise in infected patients has driven schools to become temporary hospitals, as the country leads the way in trying to restore its people’s health.

Madagascar school systems were supposed to reopen this upcoming week, but this surge in cases has lessened the potential of schools opening up in the near future. This worrying news all follows after Madagascar enforced the holistic approach to curing the coronavirus disease through a herbal tonic consumed by its locals.

The traditional medicine protection for an entire society from an oncoming worldwide pandemic, highlights the major conflict that not all foreign countries participate in western medicine practices.

Although vaccines are recommended by the World Health Organization, many foreign countries haven’t received or administered vaccines yet. Only .2% of doses have been given out in lower income countries especially within the continent of Africa. There has been a rush to distribute vaccines to these countries since joining the Covax global vaccine initiative. It has become the fastest way for international regions to achieve herd immunity.

President Andry Rajoelina of Madagascar pledged that a national remedy developed in the country, called COVID-Organics, would be the best way to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus and is capable of curing people who became infected.

In quick measures to protect the health of the other millions of citizens who could potentially become infected, President Rajoelina plans to administer vaccines for the people of Madagascar. The World Health Organization says there is no definite cure for the coronavirus, but vaccines are proven to be the best preventative measure.