First Sustainable Booking App, Hopper, Will Plant Trees For Every Hotel & Flight Booked
Photo Credit: Tim Robberts | Getty Images

Photo Credit: Tim Robberts | Getty Images

First Sustainable Booking App, Hopper, Will Plant Trees For Every Hotel & Flight Booked

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Leah Freeman-Haskin
Leah Freeman-Haskin Jan 22, 2020

Hopper, the travel booking app, just introduced Hopper Trees – the company’s first step contributing to a more sustainable future. Hopper will be the first travel-booking app to offer free carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions offsets on behalf of customers for every flight and hotel purchased in the app.

What does that mean exactly? The travel-booking app will donate funds to plant four trees per flight sold and two trees per hotel room sold in partnership with Eden Reforestation Projects.

Photo via hopper.com

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In a recent statement, the company cites research led by the lab of Professor Tom Crowther at the Swiss university, ETH Zürich, that has quantified the impact that global forest restoration can have on the environment. He found that it is “one of the most effective carbon drawdown solutions to date,” with “the potential to store an equivalent of 25% of the current atmospheric carbon pool.”

With the implementation of Hopper Trees, the company expects to see at least six million trees planted in 2020 in an effort to offset CO₂ emissions from the flights and hotels booked on Hopper this year. 

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“As Hopper grows, so too does our impact on the world around us,” Frederic Lalonde, the company’s CEO and co-founder, said in a statement, adding: “It has always been our goal to make booking travel easier and more accessible, as we believe deeply in the positive social and economic impact that it has on the world. But we also realize that with travel becoming increasingly part of our global everyday life, the environment feels its impact.”

This move comes on the heels of other major travel companies make huge strides in reducing carbon emissions, including several airlines such as JetBlueEasyJet, and Qantas, which has pledged to produce net-zero emissions by 2050.