Emilie Kouatchou Is The First Black Performer To Play Lead In Phantom of The Opera
Photo Credit: Bruce Glikas

Photo Credit: Bruce Glikas

Emilie Kouatchou Is The First Black Performer To Play Lead In Phantom of The Opera

Entertainment , Chicago , United States , news
Parker Diakite
Parker Diakite Feb 4, 2022

Broadway actress Emilie Kouatchou has just made history as the first Black performer to ever play a lead role in the “Phantom of the Opera.” The Chicago-native will play the lead role of Christine Daae.

Kouatchou originally made history back in October 2021 by becoming the first Black actor to play the role’s alternate.

It’s long overdue for the Phantom of the Opera show that has celebrated 34 years on Broadway. The actress recently told People Magazine that she is looking forward to the day when casting Black artists as firsts are no longer monumental.

“It frustrates me that it took this long, it does,” she said. “I’m honored that it’s me, and I’m honored that I’m making history, but I’m really excited for when it’s not even a question, it’s not even a thing, the first Black Christine.”

She also discussed the pressure she felt leading up to her first performance and feeling like she wasn’t good enough for the role.

“I just think that Black women, especially in theater, have to be — and it shouldn’t be this way — 10 times better and work 10 times harder…It took this long for any Black woman to play Christine, but there have been so many talented Black women who could have.”

Broadway, the popular street in Manhattan, has been associated with American theatrical activity since 1735 when the first theater reportedly opened on the street.

Throughout the centuries, however, the theater scene has struggled with representation.

A recent report from The Asian American Performers Action Coalition how that white people dominate Broadway on and behind the scenes.

During the 2017 – 2018 Broadway season, 20 percent of the shows on and off-Broadway in New York City were created by people of color, yet nearly two-thirds of the roles were filled by white actors, and 94 percent of the directors were white.

The study found that 23 percent of roles overall at New York City theaters went to Black actors.

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