Will ‘Akuna’ Robinson Becomes 1st African-American Man to Hike Triple Crown
Photo Credit: Instagram | @akunahikes

Photo Credit: Instagram | @akunahikes

Will ‘Akuna’ Robinson Becomes 1st African-American Man to Hike Triple Crown

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Parker Diakite
Parker Diakite Oct 8, 2019

Two and a half years after his step on the Pacific Crest Trail, Will ‘Akuna’ Robinson reached the northern tip of the Continental Divide Trail, one of the most significant trail systems in the world, he became the first black man to hike the big three.

Completing one trail–the Appalachian Trail (AT), Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), or Continental Divide Trail (CDT), stands out as an accomplishment that’s worth a lifetime of bragging rights alone but finishing all three? Let’s just say few even dare to try.

“Less than 450 people have registered with @aldhawest for completing the triple crown of hiking,” Robinson wrote on Instagram. “More people have left our planet on epic voyages among the stars. I’m so proud to now be included in the family of triple crowners. I don’t think it has truly sunk in that this seemingly impossible goal has been reached. Never in my wildest dreams did I think those first steps on the PCT would lead me to this moment.”

He added, “I’m just so overwhelmed and humble right now!”

Instagram | @akunahikes

Established by Congress in 1978, the Continental Divide Trail spans 3,100 miles between Mexico and Canada, goes through five states and countless communities along its spine.

Considered one of the greatest long-distance trails in the world, it is the highest, most challenging, and most remote of North America’s National Scenic Trails that range anywhere from 4,000 to 14,000 feet.

Although Robinson has been applauded as the first African-American man to achieve the Triple Crown, he’s not the first person of color to do it.

Back in July 2018, Elyse “Chardonnay” Walker finished the Appalachian Trail four years after setting the Triple Crown as a goal.