Abu Dhabi To Host A Real-Life Squid Game Event But No One Dies
Photo Credit: Bennett Raglin

Photo Credit: Bennett Raglin

Abu Dhabi To Host A Real-Life Squid Game Event But No One Dies

South Korea , Abu Dhabi , United Arab Emirates , news
Ayah A.
Ayah A. Oct 12, 2021

With the popularity of Netflix’s Squid Game, it likely comes as no surprise that a real-life event featuring the show’s games has been organized. According to CNET, the Korean Cultural Center in Abu Dhabi, UAE is holding its very own Squid Game event today. In this version, of course, no killing is allowed; the games are played purely for fun and prizes.

In the K-thriller series, which has become one of Netflix‘s most-watched shows of all time, 456 people battle it out, hoping to win their lives and a huge sum of money. They compete against one another playing deadly versions of children’s games.

The event being held at the Korean Cultural Center will include two sessions. In each session, 15 players will play against one another for the chance to win prizes. The games played will include some of the same games from the show: Red Light Green Light, the Dalgona candy game, a marbles game, and Ddakji, the folded paper tile game.

Players will don T-shirts displaying the Squid Game logo while staff members wear the same pink costumes worn by the guards in the show, complete with circle, square, and triangle masks.

Unfortunately for tourists who may have hoped to participate in the event while visiting the UAE (how cool would that have been?) the games are only open to UAE residents. In order to qualify, applicants were also required to take a test demonstrating their Squid Game knowledge.

This is not the first time someone has reenacted games from the show in real-life. Inspired by Squid Game, students of the Erquelinnes Beguinage Hainaut school in Belgium engaged in a game of Red Light Green Light during which the losers were beat up. We wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing more and more real-life Squid Game events springing up.

Related: The Viral Effect: How Netflix’s Squid Game Has Affected Life In South Korea