These Are 3 Ways The Travel Industry Can Bounce Back With Sustainability At The Forefront
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Photo Credit: Getty Images

These Are 3 Ways The Travel Industry Can Bounce Back With Sustainability At The Forefront

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Kelsey Marie
Kelsey Marie Sep 30, 2020

 Global warming has been a looming issue for years now and there are signs that since the pandemic, nature is slowly becoming happy again. Studies reveal that air pollution has been reduced globally as a result of people staying home. Although this is a great sign, there are still things we can do to aid in the earth’s recovery. 

The travel and tourism industry is responsible for about 8% of carbon emissions globally which means that if cruise companies, airlines, tour operators, and hoteliers come together, the industry can bounce back in a sustainable way. 

Here’s how travel can become more sustainable during and post the COVID-19 pandemic:

Constantly building new hotels adds to pollution. According to Bill Bensley, a Bangkok-based designer, construction of new hotels contributes to 40% of drinking water pollution, 50% of landfill waste, and 23% of air pollution globally. 

When building new hotels, choosing eco-friendly tools and products can aid in saving the earth. 

The global manager for Indagare, Colin Heinrich, tells AD, “The first choice is always preventing the emission in the first place, and so with that in mind we try to recommend that people fly as little as possible, spend a longer time in further destinations, stay in these hotels that are eco-friendlier, travel in more eco-friendly ways like electric vehicles or trail travel, dine at places the that have locally sourced food, everything like that.”

Reducing your carbon footprint doesn’t have to result in a more expensive trip. It’s the small things like walking, shopping locally and not flying as often that will help in earth’s recovery. 

It’s important to put your money where your mouth is. Do research on which companies are doing the work to become more sustainable in their practices. 

According to Bensley, “Usually when hotels are making a genuine and notable effort, they will be vocal about it. Don’t be shy to ask the reservations team questions — if they come back empty or with thinly veiled answers, be wary. Hotels who are trying want people to know all about it!”

Fortunately, travelers are becoming more conscious in the way that they travel, aiding in the travel industry’s move to being more sustainable overall.

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